CD’s still king in Japan!

How do you prefer to buy your music?
CD’s or digital Downloads?
Check out our latest Blog Post and chime in.

85 Percent of Music Sales in Japan are CD’s

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It’s a well known fact that CD sales have been going down, and fast, for some time now. Ever since people got the internet in their homes and learned what it could do, the downfall of the physical disc has been on it’s way, whether it be by piracy or iTunes. However, it appears that in an increasingly digital business, there is one place in the world where the physical still reigns supreme.

Japan, the world’s second largest music market, is completely obsessed with CDs. In fact, of all music sales in the country, 85% are CDs, whereas in other countries, digital is the leader, or in progressive spots where streaming has now taken over, such as Sweden. If that wasn’t enough of a surprise, digital sales in the country have actually been receding for years now, which is the opposite for much of the world (though not for the US, where digital sales dropped for the first time ever this past year). In fact, while online sales reached $1 billion in 2009, just four years later they raked in only $400 million—a massive fall in such a short time frame.

While it’s odd seeing almost anyone buying a compact disc these days, it is particularly strange that Japan would be leading the world in CD sales, as they are typically an early adopter when it comes to new technology. The country is often years ahead of other markets when it comes to new phones, computers, and the like.

The New York Times reports that there are perhaps two main reasons why this phenomenon is happening: a “protectionist business climate” in the music industry and a cultural love of collecting things.

The Japanese public seems to be wary of digital sales when it comes to music, and it’s hard to say completely why. It may stem from a lack of options in the sphere, which are being held back by big businesses. Not only is rights management very confusing in the country, making licensing deals difficult, but companies also aren’t too worried about venturing into the digital space at the moment. Spotify and Rdio, two of the biggest streaming options in the world, don’t have a presence in the country yet.

In countries like the US, the move to selling music digitally happened out of necessity. That’s where people had gone to find their music for free, and it was seen as the only hope for an industry bleeding profits. In Japan however, while CD sales are declining, they aren’t going down anywhere near as fast as they did elsewhere, and they still bring in big bucks.

On top of that, the Japanese have a true love of collecting things, and this can help spur sales. Many stores and artists run promotions that encourage fans to buy more than one copy of an album, such as including tickets or special artwork. Deluxe editions and greatest hits do especially well in Japan, compared to the US where they usually only convince a few die hards to spend the extra money.
Tower Records, one of many mighty CD store chains that disappeared as digital grew, is still alive and well in Japan, with all locations bringing in a combined $500 million in sales a year. In fact, when the brand filed for bankruptcy and went out of business in the US in 2006, there were 89 locations. In Japan, there are still 85 in business, and no end in sight.

CDs may be on their way out, but they aren’t dead yet. The discs still account for 41% of recorded music sales around the world, which total around $15 billion. Like vinyl, there may always be a subset of the market that wants what only CDs can offer: a plastic case, a disc, and a booklet to go with their music.

One of the best unknown rock guitarists dies

Today, Wolf’s Den marks the passing of legendary rock guitarist Dick Wagner. Dick Wagner is famous for his work with Alice Cooper (co-writing Only Women Bleed, School’s Out, and Billion Dollar Babies, among others), Lou Reed, Peter Gabriel, and Rod Stewart, but he is uncredited for work done on many albums for many bands, including Kiss.Gene Simmons: “Dick Wagner was the consummate gentleman axeman.”

He will be missed.”We here at Wolf’s Den will Miss Dick Wagner as well. R.I.P. sir.
He will live on through his work and his fans.

Check out an interview with Dick Wagner by Alice Cooper Here

Dick Wagner, esteemed Michigan rock guitarist, dead at 71
Wagner, the Michigan-bred guitarist renowned for his work with Alice Cooper, the Frost, Lou Reed and others, succumbed to respiratory failure at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center in Arizona.

Free Eventide Plugin

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Hey, Wolf pack!  Get your Free plug-in! Now through July 8,

 

Wolf’s Den Music loves to help fellow engineers and musicians get new gear and software whenever possible. Especially when it’s FREE.

Eventide is giving away their UltraChannel plug-in for FREE – a $249 value! Head over to Eventide.com and use the access code 0C4BA949 to claim your free plug-in. Share this post with your engineer friends – Like our Wolf’s Den page here on WordPress and our FaceBook page to show some love.  Who wouldn’t want an awesome channel strip plug-in for free?

Enjoy,

Wolf’s Den Music

Letter to a young songwriter

I came across this letter to a young songwriter written by singer/songwriter Mary Gauthier and thought it worth sharing. She really hits the nail on the head.

“Nearly everything that matters is a challenge, and everything matters.” — Rilke
You’ve watched your musical heroes take the stage to thunderous applause, adulation and love, and you burn for that, for yourself, and you want to be a professional writer of songs. The songwriting call has whispered in your ears for years now, and you’ve decided to answer it. You are ready to embrace it, to begin your journey as a songwriter. I congratulate you, and would offer you a few considerations (if you are open to hearing from someone who has trudged this path for decades now).

Warning: a songwriter’s life is not what you think it is.
Music is more than a bouquet of sweet vibrations; it is something from a higher world, which we humans have been given the power to invoke. Artists are alchemists, with our hands in the holy. The Sacred. Yes, there is great power in creating music, but also great danger. The journey of the artist is filled with pitfalls. Where there is great beauty and the power to move millions on this path, there is always great risk.

Songwriting is a noble calling that requires more than talent and perseverance. It requires courage. If you are willing to face yourself and honestly reveal in your songs what you’ve seen in that unveiling of yourself, then you have a chance of writing songs that will outlive you. What can we gain by walking on the moon and planets if we are not able to cross the abyss that separates us from ourselves? This is the most important of all voyages, and it is the job of the artist. The object of art is not to make salable products. It is to save one’s self, and to be a part of saving us all. Either we tell our story, or our story tells us.

And know this: A half-truth is a whole lie. Character, like integrity, is much easier kept than recovered. So write from your true self, not the self you think you should be. Do not try to impress us, and do not hide behind thin walls and smoke screens. It will only bore us. Brutal self -honesty is your challenge, and will reward you with much more than you can yet imagine.

You must learn how to reject acceptance and accept rejection. People’s opinions of you and your work are irrelevant. The search for love and applause has no place in the creative process. Here is what I know: thriving artists suffer from a feeling of inferiority, a feeling of reaching for something that keeps being just outside our grasp. We make contact with it, and then it turns to smoke. It cannot be held. So our work involves a constant striving. Those that don’t know this feeling are pretending to be close to art and live in secret fear of the aloneness of the deep creative process. Art requires audacity, and if you are not afraid, you are not taking risks. You will simply skim the surface and offer the world nothing new. Ultimately, your songs will not matter.

An artist’s job is to reach communion with truth, and bring that holy light into the world in order to soothe souls trapped in dark places. It is exceedingly difficult work and most who attempt it fail. That said, there is no safety in success either. In fact, triumph brings a greater danger, because the intense light of success is a wick that draws in darkness. Stars burn up. Flame out. Stars overdose, suicide. Some become oldies acts that create no new magic but simply repeat what has already been done over and over again, not for beauty’s sake, but for cash. And they suffer this as a humiliation and become bitter. A deep grounding in solitude is necessary to remain vital and creative. Solitude courts the muse. So know this: you have chosen a lonely path.

As you work, you will have to learn to embrace each failure as an unavoidable part of the process. There will be many false starts and errors, and even though it is terrifying, you must continue to err, and to do so on the bold side. Have the audacity to lose face, don’t worry about saving it, and embrace each glorious failure as a necessary part of the journey. The chief danger in songwriting (and life) is taking too many precautions. There is a very real relationship between what you contribute and what you get out of this life, but satisfaction lies in the effort, not in the attainment. The point of the work is the work. Being vulnerable in your work will bring you strength.

And here is a final warning. If you do succeed and people come to know your name and your songs, the creative process gets harder, not easier. Fame and success attracts parasites, clingers on, and wannabe’s. These non-creators will do everything in their power to attach to the light around you thinking it will bring them out of their own darkness. It will not, but they do not know this. If you let them in, their hungry mouths will suck the light from you and when you are emptied they will simply move on and attach to someone else’s glow. You must rid your life of these people, or suffer their debilitating and soul crushing manipulations.

Fame and success also bring laziness, and ego swelling. With success comes the confusion of believing you are doing great work, backed up the reassurance of people on your payroll, when you are not. It is easy to become delusional and get lost. Fame is a full time job. So is songwriting. A choice is often required. Choose wisely.

So then, again the point of all this work is simply the work. Struggle is the path, and there is no destination, only the path. We do not get “there.” There is no there. There is only here, now, on the path, in the struggle. We all must face the daunting blank page in front of each of us each morning. In this, we are all alike. I wish courage and perseverance for you as you embark on this life’s work of writing songs. You will need it.

The uphill battle for song writers and artists

This is why we as song writers and artists can’t have nice things.
Groups like Pandora, Spotify and Big Record Labels constantly picking our pockets and leaving us for broke. This just makes me sad.

Original article here:  http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/03/pandora-emerges-mostly-unscathed-in-legal-showdown-with-songwriters/

Pandora emerges mostly unscathed in legal showdown with songwriters

Royalties for streaming radio service will stay at 1.85 percent through 2015.

by Joe Silver – Mar 17 2014, 7:05pm EDT

COPYRIGHT LAWSUITS
On Friday, a federal judge ruled that the streaming radio service Pandora will continue paying the same royalty rate it was previously required to pay to songwriters through 2015.

In her opinion, US District Judge Denise Cote wrote that Pandora must continue paying the American Society of Composers Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) 1.85 percent of its revenue from the years 2011 through 2015 to use ASCAP songs on its streaming music service.

The 1.85 percent figure Pandora will pay is higher than the 1.7 percent rate that Pandora hoped for—1.7 percent is what terrestrial radio stations are required to pay for digital webcasts. Still, Cote’s ruling is much closer to Pandora’s suggestion than ASCAP’s; the songwriters’ group wanted to see a rate that started at 1.85 percent, then rose to 2.5 percent in 2014 and three percent in 2015.

Despite failing to convince the court of their desired rate, ASCAP nevertheless declared victory. “We are pleased the court recognized the need for Pandora to pay a higher rate than traditional radio stations,” said ASCAP CEO John LoFrumento.

Sony/ATV Music CEO Martin Bandier was less eager to declare this outcome as favorable for artists. “This rate is woefully inadequate and further emphasizes the need for reform in the rate court proceedings,” he told Billboard. “Songwriters can’t live in a world where streaming services only pay 1.8 percent of their revenue. This is a loss and not something we can live with.”

This small victory for Pandora won’t fundamentally change its long-term business concerns, which center around copyright payments. Pandora pays out about half of its revenue in copyright license fees, with the great majority of that going to record labels, not ASCAP.